ConteLearLe

 
Materials used to manufacture bodykit
 
 
Fiber Reinforced Plastic:
This material is reinforced by the glass fibers in the polyester resin which strengthens fiber reinforced plastic products. A great property of this material is that you can form any size or shape while still retaining a large degree of strength. Due to these characteristics, FRP is widely used by most aero-parts manufacturers.
 
Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic:
Generally FRP is reinforced using only glass fibers. Carbon fiber derives its strength and lightness by replacing these glass fibers with carbon fibers in the resin.
 
Carbon Honeycomb Composite:
When creating products using this material, we insert a sheet consisting of numerous thin honeycomb shapes, between two thin sheets of carbon fiber, creating the strongest, and lightest of all carbon composites. This method is often applied to the chassis of Formula-1 cars where the strongest and most lightweight materials are needed.
 
Dry Carbon Composite:
The literal name of this material is ECC (Epoxy Carbon Composite), but generally it is known as Dry Carbon. Dry Carbon is a plastic reinforced with an epoxy resin containing Carbon Fiber. Vacuum bag processing is used to apply heavy pressure, and then extreme heat is applied to harden the product, creating an amazingly strong and lightweight material.
 
Polyester Carbon Composite:
We uses PCC for almost all of our own exclusive Carbon Fiber products. The polyester resin is the same as that of FRP, but instead of glass fibers, Carbon Fibers are used to reinforce the product. Unlike FRP, the Carbon fibers in PCC are layered on top of each other, which is what makes PCC extremely strong and durable.
 
Press Polyester Carbon Composite:
PPCC is basically the same material as PCC, but PPCC will provide better rigidity than PCC when creating complex shapes. This new method is used when producing much more complicated shapes that were originally almost impossible for others to create.
 
Polyurethane:
Urethane is known as a common material in the mass-production of aero-parts. The method used for manufacturing polyurethane differs completely from the method used to manufacture FRP. When manufacturing polyurethane aero-parts, two liquid resins are mixed together, and a press is used to harden the material. There are varying degrees of strength when referring to polyurethane, and the type used to manufacture aero-parts is similar in strength to polypropylene, and is known to be very flexible, and hard to crack.
 

Polypropylene:
Over recent years polypropylene (PP) is used by most auto manufacturer for OEM bodyparts, polypropylene (PP) is low in cost but has outstanding mechanical properties and moldability, it accounts for more than half of all the plastic materials used in automobiles. PP compounds are used for a variety of parts, including bumper facias, instrumental panels and door trims, optimal balance of mechanical properties and excellent surface finish allow it to replace metal at lower cost in an expanding range of exterior, interior and under-the-bonnet, applications.  Moreover, combined with ease of processing, enhanced part integration possibilities and outstanding end-use performance.

 

ABS Plastic:
ABS plastics offer a good balance of tensile strength, impact and abrasion resistance, dimensional stability, surface hardness, rigidity, heat resistance, low-temperature properties, chemical resistance, and electrical characteristics. These materials yield plastically at high stresses, so ultimate elongation is seldom significant in design; a part usually can be bent beyond its elastic limit without breaking, although it does stress-whiten. While not generally considered flexible, ABS parts have enough spring to accommodate snap-fit assembly requirements.

 

 

 
Bodykit Material Guide
 
 

With thousands of body kit, ground effects and aerodynamic styling options available, finding the right body kit for your needs can seem overwhelming at first. As you look around our site, you'll notice that body kits are constructed of various materials, each of which has its own distinct characteristics. Which one is best for your needs? Here's a quick rundown of the pros and cons of each:

 

 

Definition

Pros

Cons

Fiberglass

Composite material made from extremely fine glass fibers

-

Low price

-

Light weight

-

Rigidity allows for more extreme styles

-

Requires extra prep work for best finish

- Easy to repair

Polyurethane

Thick, organic resin-based polymer material

-

Very flexible and durable

-

Good fitment

-

Heavy

-

Difficult to repair

Carbon Fiber

Composite material made of weaved carbon filaments covered with a clear resin

-

Spectacular looks

-

Finished product-no painting required

-

Expensive

-

Repairable depending on damage

FRP Composite

Fiber-Reinforced Polymer. Also known as Poly-Fiber.

-

Light weight

-

Rigidity allows for more extreme styles

-

Requires extra prep work for best finish

-Easy to repair

ABS Plastic

Petroleum-based thermoplastic material; commonly used on factory bumpers

-

Good fitment

-

Durable

-

Difficult to repair

 

Please note: The ratings listed above are for general comparison purposes only. Price and features vary widely by manufacturer and style.

 

 

 
Installation tips for installing bodykits and bodypanels
 
 
For best fitment and durability, we strongly recommend that you have your body kit and/or body panels installed by a qualified body shop. Feel free to pass the following important information on to your installer to help ensure a smooth and easy installation.
 

1.

Fiberglass and polyurethane body components may warp slightly during shipment. This is normal and can be corrected by leaving the body kit out in the sun or in a warm room for a few hours.

2.

Your body shop should test fit all body panels on the vehicle BEFORE sanding, drilling, filling, cutting, painting, or otherwise modifying it. Parts are not returnable once modified in any way.

3.

Ask your installer to notify you of any structural modifications necessary in the installation of your body kit.

4.

Ask your installer to add a flex agent to the body kit's paint to help keep it from flaking off. This is especially important when installing polyurethane or ABS plastic bumpers.

 

 

 
Installation guide
 
 
Lip spoiler
Click to download our installlation guide in PDF (Under construction)
 
Trunk spoiler
Click to download our installlation guide in PDF (Under construction)
 
Mirror cover
Click to download our installlation guide in PDF (Under construction)

 

 

 
Learn all about Aerodynamic
 
 
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Technical-5

 

 
How to improve Aerodynamic
 
 
Technical-6

 

 
How does aero parts improve Stability
 
 
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odynamicnt for c

 
Wide Arch kit
 
 
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DIY
 
 
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